Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster

Court: German Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster Not Serious Enough

By Stephen Fuchs on Email @StephenWFuchs

Pastafarians in the German town of Templin, birthplace of German Chancellor Angela Merkel, are up in arms after their attempt to advertise the times for their weekly services at the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster in the town’s entrance was denied by local judges who cite, among other things, a lack of vision as being a deciding factor.

Started by a 24-year-old Oregon State University physics graduate in 2005, the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster takes a more light-hearted view on religion to oppose the teaching of a higher power, often using modified versions of Christian iconography and art to draw a laugh. Seen mostly as a parody, attempts to be seen as a valid religion have failed in most areas of the world, leaving the Netherlands and New Zealand among the only countries not laughing off the group.

This lack of acceptance wasn’t going to stop its German members from staying silent though, arguing that their “humanist” views are valid world views that should afford them the right to have equal representation among the advertised churches in the town.

In the court’s statement announcing their ruling, it was said that the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster’s foundation of mocking Christianity and other religions “is not a system of thought comprehensively related to the world in the sense of a particular philosophy or view of life.”

The next Flying Spaghetti Monster plan of attack is an appeal to the Federal Court of Justice (BGH), and if it too laughs off the case, the Federal Constitution Court and European Court of Justice are next on the list.

Sources: Bild

Stephen Fuchs
Stephen founded German Pulse and LGBT Germany out of a passion to introduce Americans to a Germany that goes beyond beer and polka (although with enough beer he has been known to polka it up a bit). He's a coffee addict, lover of wine and good times, a hit in the kitchen and editor of TV commercials. You can follow him on Twitter (@StephenWFuchs) to find out a lot more.
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