President Barack Obama Issues Presidential Proclamation For German-America Day 2014

By Stephen Fuchs on Email @StephenWFuchs

Obama Signing Dark

Since 1987, the German-American community has celebrated German-American Day every year on October 6, to honor not only the anniversary of German immigration to the United States but the influential culture that the Germans brought to this country. It was under President Ronald Reagan, along with the help of various influential German-American organizations at the time, that the day became recognized. Congress officially approved the resolution to designate October 6 as German-American Day on August 6, 1987, and then became Public Law when it was signed by Reagan twelve days later.

Now, 27 years later, German-American Day is still recognized and celebrated around the country by those who are proud of their German heritage. Staying true to the tradition carried out by Ronald Reagan in 1987, President Barack Obama has issued a Presidential Proclamation for German-American Day 2014 in time for the event. We’ve included the full text below…

 

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

America is and always has been a Nation of immigrants, and from our earliest days, German Americans have contributed to our national identity. Germans were among the first settlers in the original 13 Colonies, bringing their talents and ideas across the ocean to a new and unfamiliar world. And today, with their descendants and all who followed in their path, we continue to perfect our Union together. On German-American Day, we recognize their distinctive identity and the ways they enrich our country.

German Americans helped build our Nation, and every day they contribute to its growth. As they teach in our schools, farm in our heartland, and serve in our Armed Forces, their German roots offer a sense of their place in the American story. From a land of poets and thinkers, they brought passion for music, science, and art, fortifying our culture and broadening our understanding of the world. Our greatest cities and our biggest advances reflect their daring spirit and diverse contributions.

As we consider our German-American history, we are also reminded that the United States and Germany are vital partners. With the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall approaching, our security and prosperity remain interwoven, and our friendship continues as we work together in pursuit of a more peaceful, stable world. On this occasion, may citizens from both sides of the Atlantic draw strength from the legacy of our Nation’s earliest immigrants who boldly pushed forward in unforgiving times. May our shared past continue to inspire us as we face new challenges in our own time.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 6, 2014, as German-American Day. I encourage all Americans to learn more about the history of German Americans and reflect on the many contributions they have made to our Nation.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this third day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand fourteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-ninth.

BARACK OBAMA

 

Photo: Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

Stephen Fuchs
Stephen founded German Pulse and LGBT Germany out of a passion to introduce Americans to a Germany that goes beyond beer and polka (although with enough beer he has been known to polka it up a bit). He's a coffee addict, lover of wine and good times, a hit in the kitchen and editor of TV commercials. You can follow him on Twitter (@StephenWFuchs) to find out a lot more.
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