New Leak Reveals NSA Spying On Merkel Was In Response To Spying Initiative Against U.S.

By Stephen Fuchs on Email @StephenWFuchs

Hardcore Hackers

On Saturday a Speigel article reported that the NSA had kept more than 300 files on German Chancellor Angela Merkel, which was believed to be a result of the extensive wiretapping scandal that broke last year.  However, this morning The Guardian has released a new set of classified documents uncovered by Edward Snowden that has shed some new light on the spying scandal between the U.S. and Germany.

According to the Guardian’s report, the German government and Merkel weren’t as innocent as some had first believed.  In fact, the top-secret documents leaked by Snowden revealed that the NSA wiretapping on Merkel’s phone calls was done in retaliation for a quite extensive spying program Germany had put in place against the U.S. that dates back to 1996.

Various top U.S. officials and departments had been bugged to gain valuable economic data that, according to the leaked documents, Germany has been using to eventually make the euro replace the U.S. dollar as the dominant world currency.

The U.S. government discovered the full extent of this elaborate spying scheme during an investigation into the 2008 economic collapse, in which it was discovered that Germany played a major role in setting up.  Instead of publicly calling out Germany, the U.S. decided to do a little spying of their own to ensure that the euro would not benefit from the tough economy in America.

For the last few months, news media had questioned the purpose for the NSA spying on Merkel, and while many believed it to be connected to terrorism-related concerns, this new leak is showing that it instead was a form of payback to sabotage the euro from having a chance to overthrow the U.S. dollar.

We’ll be following the story as it develops and report any new information as it comes in.

 

Source: April Fools
Photo: Brian Klug [Flickr]

Stephen Fuchs
Stephen founded German Pulse and LGBT Germany out of a passion to introduce Americans to a Germany that goes beyond beer and polka (although with enough beer he has been known to polka it up a bit). He's a coffee addict, lover of wine and good times, a hit in the kitchen and editor of TV commercials. You can follow him on Twitter (@StephenWFuchs) to find out a lot more.
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