German Internet Emergency Button for Kids… Is It Necessary?

By Stephen Fuchs on Email @StephenWFuchs

German Family Minister Kristina Schröder has released her plans to implement an “emergency button” on the web for children and young adults. Schröder’s argument is that young people are finding themselves threatened by the content they find on the internet, including cyber-bullying, and there should be a way for kids to easily inform an online protection center of any harmful material.

Schröder stated that her ministry discovered that 95% of parents thought it was important that their children be protected online, but only 20% have actually used programs designed to keep their children safe.

Now this is my own opinion, but isn’t a program like this just taking away more of the parents responsibilities and handing it over to the government? Every generation of kids face bullying in their childhood and in recent years it seems governments are trying to get involved. But are they really the best ones to handle the issue? I’m not as familiar with the situation in Germany, but in the US our federal and state governments are stepping in and as a result are taking away another responsibility of parenthood.

Do I think bullying is good? No. But if kids are overly protected from tough situations in life, how are they going to learn to deal with the tough situations later on? Are we going to implement an emergency button at work, or for family situations? Instead of giving an easy out with an emergency button, how about parents educating their children on how to properly deal with bullying or taking an interest in their children to see if their child is being a bully.

Source: Deutsche Welle

Stephen Fuchs
Stephen founded German Pulse and LGBT Germany out of a passion to introduce Americans to a Germany that goes beyond beer and polka (although with enough beer he has been known to polka it up a bit). He's a coffee addict, lover of wine and good times, a hit in the kitchen and editor of TV commercials. You can follow him on Twitter (@StephenWFuchs) to find out a lot more.
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